1. BlackBerry

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  2. About BlackBerry

    The BlackBerry is a wireless handheld device introduced in 1999 which supports push e-mail, mobile telephone, text messaging, internet faxing, web browsing and other wireless information services. Developed by the Canadian company Research In Motion (RIM), it delivers information over the wireless data networks of mobile phone service companies. BlackBerry first made headway in the marketplace by concentrating on e-mail. RIM currently offers BlackBerry e-mail service to non-BlackBerry devices, such as the Palm Treo, through the BlackBerry Connect software. The original BlackBerry device had a monochrome display, but all current models have color displays.

    While including the usual PDA applications (address book, calendar, to-do lists, etc.) as well as telephone capabilities on newer models, the BlackBerry is primarily known for its ability to send and receive e-mail wherever it can access a wireless network of certain cellular phone carriers. It has a built-in keyboard, optimized for "thumbing", the use of only the thumbs to type. System navigation is primarily accomplished by the trackwheel (or "thumbwheel"), a scrolling wheel with a "CLICK" function, located on the right side of the device. Newer models are now utilizing a trackball in the middle of the device as Research In Motion has moved from the trackwheel to the trackball. Some models (currently, those manufactured for use with iDEN networks such as Nextel and Telus) also incorporate a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Push-to-Talk PTT] (Push-To-Talk) feature, similar to a two-way radio. Some BlackBerry devices don't depend on mobile phone service coverage and are Wi-Fi compatible like similar handheld devices that are on the marketplace.

    Modern BlackBerry handhelds incorporate an ARM 7 or 9 processor, while older BlackBerry 950 and 957 handhelds used Intel 80386 processors. The latest GSM BlackBerry models (8100 and 8700 series) have an Intel PXA901 312 MHz processor, 64 MB flash memory and 16 MB SDRAM.
    CDMA BlackBerry smartphones are based on Qualcomm MSM6x00 chipsets which also include the ARM 9-based processor and GSM 900/1800 roaming(as the case with the 8830).
    The devices are very popular with some businesses, where they are primarily used to provide e-mail access to roaming employees. To fully integrate the BlackBerry into a company's systems, the installation of
    BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) is required.

    On April 11 2007, RIM announced the number of BlackBerry subscribers had reached 8 million.

  3. Quotes about BlackBerry

    1. Everybody is trying to save a buck on IT management, I imagine Yahoo did some research with employees before making the announcement and discovered that the number of workers preferring a BlackBerry over an iPhone or Android was fairly miniscule.
      Charles King in Yahoo Fires RIM Shot to Workers: No More BlackBerries for You
    2. The forward-looking responses hint at Android's continued rise and greater enterprise acceptance for Windows mobile devices. Only 2 percent of IT managers plan to start supporting BlackBerry devices in 2013, suggesting a loss of interest in the brand.
      In BYOD Changing Attitudes to Mobile IT: MobileIron
    3. Many companies who weren't sure of BlackBerry's future were willing to kick the can down the road.
      In In Wake of BlackBerry's Demise, CIOs Look to Samsung, Apple and Microsoft